shaw bransford & roth case law update

First Circuit: No Need to Correctly Label Legal Theory for OSC Exhaustion

An ICE Supervisory Special Agent delivered a document to a colleague at the direction of his supervisor, the Assistant Special Agent in Charge. The colleague (a Special Agent) later used the document in support of his own whistleblower case against the Agency. After the Agency learned of the Supervisory Special Agent’s involvement in his colleague’s appeal, he was not selected for promotion, and received a lower-than-normal performance appraisal. He then filed a complaint with the Office of Special Counsel, alleging that the agency retaliated against him for providing information to his colleague that was later used in his colleague’s appeal.

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shaw bransford & roth case law update

Fifth Circuit: Duration of Immigration Stop, Not the Questions Asked by Agents, Determines Its Constitutionality

On May 26, 2017, Miguel Angel Vega-Torres was a passenger on a commercial bus that stopped at a border patrol checkpoint in Falfurrias, Texas. Border Patrol Agent David Gonzalez conducted an inspection of the bus at the checkpoint. During that inspection, Agent Gonzalez asked Vega-Torres for his citizenship documentation. Vega-Torres handed Agent Gonzalez his Legal Permanent Resident (“LPR”) card. Agent Gonzalez had a difficult time matching Vega-Torres’s face with the LPR card photo because Vega-Torres was occupied on his cell phone and made brief eye contact with Agent Gonzalez.

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shaw bransford & roth case law update

D.C. Circuit: Unions Must Use FLRA to Challenge Trump’s Fed Workforce Executive Orders

After the president issued three executive orders regarding relations between the federal government and its employees, several federal employee unions filed lawsuits in district court to challenge provisions in those orders. Those suits were consolidated at the district court in June 2018. In its August 2018 decision, the district court found several provisions in the executive orders unlawful, and ordered agencies to cease implementation of those provisions. The government appealed the district court decision, and on July 16, 2019, the United States Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit found that the district court lacked jurisdiction to hear the unions’ claims, and vacated the district court judgment.

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shaw bransford & roth case law update

Appeals Court: ICE Had No Duty to Bargain Before Unilateral Change to Overtime Policy

After warnings from the Office of Special Counsel (OSC) and the Government Accountability Office (GAO), the Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) made a change to how it calculated overtime pay. The American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE) filed a grievance against ICE for unilaterally changing the policy without bargaining with the union. After the Federal Labor Relations Authority (FLRA) sided with ICE and determined that ICE had no duty to bargain with the union, AFGE petitioned the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit for review of the FLRA’s final order. On June 11, 2019, the appeals court denied AFGE’s petition.

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